Manhattan Micro-Loft

Located at the top of a brownstone on Manhattan's Upper West Side, this apartment had a tiny footprint of just 425 feet, but the space stretched vertically for approximately 25 feet, and had access to a roof terrace.

Our solution created four separate "living platforms" inserted within the space that provide room for all the essentials and still allow the apartment to feel open and light-filled. The lowest level is an entry and kitchen space, and a few steps up is the main living area. Above the living area is a cantilevered bed pavilion that projects out into the main space, supported on steel beams. A final stair leads up to a roof garden. All the spaces flow into one another, and the idea of distinct "rooms" dissolved.

Given the miniscule size of the apartment, every inch of space is put to use. Stairs are not merely for circulation through the apartment, but feature built-in storage cabinetry and drawers below. The main bath and shower, in fact, are also built below the primary staircase. The kitchen features fully concealed appliances, flip up high storage units for easy access, and a countertop that wraps into the main living space, becoming a virtual 'hearth' with built-in entertainment system. There are no traditional closets in the entire apartment.

Materials throughout are selected to emphasize the spatial characteristics of the project. The perimeter is light, with painted (existing) brick, glass backsplashes and shelving, and white lacquered kitchen cabinets, stair cabinets, and fittings. The cantilevered bed pavilion is clad in dark wood, and anchors the space - a central object around which everything revolves. A dark wood floor and wood stair treads lead through and around the apartment, spiraling up onto the wood deck at the room. Given the number of built-in features, furnishings are minimal in number, with only a couch, coffee table, bed, and a side chair necessary.

Design Team: Scott Specht, Louise Harpman, Amy Lopez-Cepero, Sheryl Jordan, Devin Keyes

Photography: Taggart Sorenson

Press and Awards

AIA Design Award
Architizer A+ Award
The New York Times
"Tiny Homes Hunting" on DIY TV
Interior Design "Best of Year"

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What Houzz contributors are saying:

lolalina
Laura Gaskill added this to 12 Space-Maximising Tricks That Transform Small Rooms13 July 2017

Smart stairs Space beneath the stairs should be put to work in a compact space, and what better way than with perfectly fitted storage compartments? An open-sided, rather than walled-in, staircase keeps a small room feeling more spacious and allows light into the upper level.TELL US Do you live in a small space? How do you make it work? Share your thoughts and tips in the Comments below.MORERead more stories on small spaces

melodybaywt
Melody Bay added this to Bringing Hygge into the Singapore Home8 June 2017

If you have a staircase, an assortment of cabinets and drawers like this one works better than a single large cabinet, which may not fully maximise the potential storage space under the stairs. To keep the look clean and smooth, avoid using visible handles or pulls.

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